Prep for test fit — Rear suspension

This post continues the description of the test fit preparations (Ref Prep for Test fit — Rear axle and hubs).

The rear springs were in a sorry state – with a lot of surface rust and the rubber parts in varying states of disintegration. Anticipating this I ordered a set of front and rear rubber suspension components from the Daimler and Jaguar Spare Parts Club. Being a member means I can be very lazy and ring up and order “a full set of suspension rubber parts for a Mk2 please”, no mucking about with part numbers, and soon a box of goodness arrives. Continue reading Prep for test fit — Rear suspension

Petrol tank – 2

This post continues the description of the fuel tank restoration. Refer to petrol tank – 1.

The POR-15 Fuel Tank Repair Kit I purchased contained:
4 litres Cleaner Degreaser
1 litre Metal ready
1 litre Tank Sealer

There’s a fair bit of work involved in using the POR-15 tank sealer products. The first step is to clean the inside of the tank with Cleaner Degreaser. You mix 2 litres of Cleaner Degreaser with one litre of hot water and slosh the mixture around the tank for about 20 minutes before draining it out. It will be quite dirty. After flushing with water, repeat the process with the remaining Cleaner Degreaser and hot water. After flushing again, the water coming out of the tank should be reasonably clear. It was in my case.
Continue reading Petrol tank – 2

Petrol tank – 1

My petrol tank seemed to be in reasonable condition apart from a healthy coating of surface rust on the top surface. The underside of the tank was less rusty, probably due to a combination of underseal and the usual grease that seems to accumulate under old Jags. I asked around, and the prevailing wisdom is that media blasting an old tank is likely to cause problems with old, and possibly thin, metal. A safer approach is to treat the rust chemically and then apply paint. I decided to take this approach, using POR-15 products. Continue reading Petrol tank – 1